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Sweetwater Forums [Archived]

After 15 years of great discussions, the Sweetwater Forums are now closed and preserved as a "read-only" resource. For discussions about current gear, check us out on Facebook, YouTube, inSync, and our Knowledge Base.

Too much bleed

Roy

I`m a sound tech for a church`s praise band.We use Beta 58s(8 mics for vocals) and everytime the bleed from guitar,keyboard and bass amps makes the mix muddy and uncontrollable.What do I do to reduce the bleed and get a tight mix? Is the problem with the mics?Thanks.
May 7, 2013 @07:26am
Bill Duck

Hello Roy,
In reply to your query,"...could it be the mics?". Yes it can. Neodymium mics like Beta's, have stronger magnetic flux and have a tendency to pull forward background sound such as you described. If your mic cabinet has regular SM-58's, try them instead. If not, make sure your performers are right-on the mics and trim out the 'Proximity' effect accordingly. This will allow you to decrease the gain on the mic channels and reduce the afore mentioned problem. I try not to use Beta's on shallow stages when I can. Beta 58's also have a more 'ragged' response and one must work harder in Monitor World. Other solutions might be isolation of loud elements via shields and /or cooperation with players. Good sound is a cooperative venture. Good Luck!!...Bill Duck
May 24, 2013 @09:34pm
TimmyP1955

Hello Roy,
In reply to your query,"...could it be the mics?". Yes it can. Neodymium mics like Beta's, have stronger magnetic flux and have a tendency to pull forward background sound such as you described.

This has nothing to do with the magnet type, and everything to do with the pickup pattern of the microphone.
May 31, 2013 @04:40am
Slider

Wouldnt stage noise be considered in this as well? If guitar amps are facing out instead of at the player, and the amps are behind the singers, this could reak havoc as well. If the Pro's of sweetwater agree with this as well, maybe turning the amps in and micing them with an sm57 or the like would be much more controlable. I only have hands on experience of 10 years, no formal training, so I maybe wrong. If so, someone correct me.
June 24, 2013 @06:51pm
TimmyP1955

Facing them away from the mics will certainly help, as will turning them down. Or better yet, stick them in an another space (closer, hall, etc.).
June 25, 2013 @04:27am
Landon

This is one of the reasons why so many of the newer mics (like the Sennheisers and others) have such tight patterns. The tried and true SM58 is also pretty good, but you're going to want one of those tight pattern mics. Another option, like others suggested, would be to change the set up so that the mics aren't picking up the unwanted signals. You could also try a gate.
January 6, 2014 @02:44am