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Multitrack recording from Yamaha LS9 - 32

Jamesacoker

First post here so I'm not sure if this is the correct place for this but here goes.
My church purchased a Yamaha LS9 - 32 about a year ago now and we've recently begun trying to create audio recordings of our services. I've about got recording from 2 of the aux outputs figured out but the recording quality is not as good as we would like so we're trying to see if there's a way to record multi-track to a computer. I found a forum post from Sweetwater about it but it was published in 2009 and one or two of the links no longer go to the correct product. Right now I'm recording from a Sony Vaio laptop running Windows 7 Pro 64 bit but we also have an HP tower also running Win 7 Pro 64 bit available to use.
I've been doing a good bit of searching but I can't find many specifics. So far I know that I'll be needing to use both of the expansion card slots on the back of the LS9 and that the solution will most likely be sound over ethernet, to a network switch that the computer is also connected to but that's it.
Could anyone try to explain how this would work and/or link me to the products we would need to get? I've seen a fair amount of information on the Dante-MY16-AUD card but would this be the best option or is there something else that would be better/somewhat easier?
Thanks, James Coker
August 6, 2012 @08:15pm
michaelhoddy

The Dante cards are a great option, because on the other end (at your PC), you only need Audinate's Virtual sound card software ($149) and an ethernet port. No audio interface and less complexity, especially with things like clocking. That would get you up to 32 channels out of your console.
The other, more conventional option is a pair of MY16-AT ADAT light pipe cards, and some of PCIe-based ADAT interface (like the RME RayDat or similar). This would also get you 32 channels in and out, and should also work well, although it has the potential to be more complex to manage.
August 6, 2012 @09:08pm
TimmyP1955

Is your complaint the mix, or problems with distortion, etc? If the latter, that's an operator problem (gain structure, such as overdriving the inputs of the computer).
Dante is likely the way to go, but prepare to be shocked at the price of the driver license (which is still cheaper than an EtherSound card for the computer). IIRC, on a Yamaha you'll need two cards if you want to record more than 16 tracks simultaneously.
September 2, 2012 @09:35pm
techman47

Just get a Motu and send some of the omni outs from the back of the LS9 to the inputs of the motu. Then connect the motu to your computer. Record using pro tools or simular software. Multi-track recording Presto!
October 18, 2012 @04:57pm
TimmyP1955

Just get a Motu and send some of the omni outs from the back of the LS9 to the inputs of the motu. Then connect the motu to your computer. Record using pro tools or simular software. Multi-track recording Presto!

By the time he'd get to a decent track count, he'd be out of Omnis. And there would be extra D-A and A-D.
October 20, 2012 @02:28am
ocastro

Easier.... just copy L R to any of the outputs per example outputs 14 and 13 and if you want send it first to a pair of matrix and then you have control of whats is been send it to.
Is a 2 channel recording but with practice and good mixing skills you'll have great recordings. I do it all the time so i can check how was my mixing after a show.
Good luck!
March 7, 2013 @05:47pm
TimmyP1955

I thought I had read that the Dante software was $750. At $150, it's a no brainer. Plus, right now it's on sale for $30! I may buy it just to have it handy.
With the LS9 I believe you need two cards, owing to the console's 16ch per slot limit.
March 10, 2013 @07:10am
rickcperry

First post here so I'm not sure if this is the correct place for this but here goes.
My church purchased a Yamaha LS9 - 32 about a year ago now and we've recently begun trying to create audio recordings of our services. I've about got recording from 2 of the aux outputs figured out but the recording quality is not as good as we would like so we're trying to see if there's a way to record multi-track to a computer. I found a forum post from Sweetwater about it but it was published in 2009 and one or two of the links no longer go to the correct product. Right now I'm recording from a Sony Vaio laptop running Windows 7 Pro 64 bit but we also have an HP tower also running Win 7 Pro 64 bit available to use.
I've been doing a good bit of searching but I can't find many specifics. So far I know that I'll be needing to use both of the expansion card slots on the back of the LS9 and that the solution will most likely be sound over ethernet, to a network switch that the computer is also connected to but that's it.
Could anyone try to explain how this would work and/or link me to the products we would need to get? I've seen a fair amount of information on the Dante-MY16-AUD card but would this be the best option or is there something else that would be better/somewhat easier?
Thanks, James Coker

Go to the second layer and assign the channels 33-64 with the inputs for 1-32. You will now have the second layer looking like the first layer inputs.
Now take 2 mix busses and link them to stereo in the setup menu. Let's say mix 11 and 12
Go to the mix buss and set them to POST FADE
Go to the USB recorder and set the input to the recorder for LEFT Mix 11 / RIGHT Mix 12
While mixing your set, go to the aux send 11/12 by tapping the 11 on the aux mix, set your sends on fader levels to 0 or Unity.
Do a test recording on the USB drive, go to the recorder and see what the levels look like. You may need to gain up the recorder in the recorder screen ATT knob. Get the highest reading without going into the red.
You can adjust your mix by cueing up the aux mix in the headphones and going to the sends on fader and moving the faders to obtain a good sounding mix.
Record and playback your music and see what you have. I set the playback of the recorder on either of the 4 ST outputs on the right of the board.
If you like this trick, assign the user define keys for cue, record and stop so that you don't have to go back and forth to the recorder screen.
Hope this helps
December 1, 2013 @04:48am