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Can i replace internal 5400RMP drive with a 7200RPM drive on Macbook Pro?

brianbfw

Question says it all.
I received a Macbook pro for Christmas. Love it. However, the internal drive is only 5400RPM, which i believe is too slow for recording. I have two questions.
1)Can i just replace the drive with a 7200RMP drive. Nobody seemed to know the answer at the local apple store.
2)If i cannot replace the drive, could i use an external (such as a Glyph) over the FireWire 800 port? Would this be fast enough for recording, or is an external drive too slow for this.
thanks
brian
December 27, 2009 @09:31pm
spencerstudio

I guy at the apple store told me that I could put one in my standard macbook so im sure you could in the pro. but he only recomended a 5400 for a labtop because it would use more processing power and that battery life would be reduced..and may also be a little louder. so if you are relying on the battery a lot I would recomend keeping the 5400, but thats just here say! maybe that helps
December 27, 2009 @11:44pm
jpleong

Yes and yes.
JP
December 27, 2009 @11:54pm
michaelhoddy

If you only have a limited budget, I would keep the 5400 drive as a system drive and buy an external drive for audio. This is the best all-around solution. But yes, you can upgrade the internal drive.
For external drives for audio apps, FireWire 400 is adequate if it's cheaper. I've never maxed a 400 drive in terms of bandwidth for audio, even with 24 tracks recording at a time.
December 28, 2009 @01:15am
brianbfw

i don't mind using a power cord, so battery life is not an issue.
I plan to be tracking a band, but not all insturments at once. I'll think i'll probably need a max of 24 tracks at 24-bit/48khz audio.
will using an external drive for audio introduce any latency?
as far as price, there doesn't seem to be much difference between replacing the internal drive and going with an external. so i'm just trying to figure what will be the best in terms of performance.
thanks
brian
December 28, 2009 @01:20am
michaelhoddy

I plan to be tracking a band, but not all insturments at once. I'll think i'll probably need a max of 24 tracks at 24-bit/48khz audio.
will using an external drive for audio introduce any latency?

If you're doing this, you definitely want an external drive. Even a 7200 RPM drive that's shared as a system drive is going to struggle to keep up.
Any Firewire drive that's dedicated is not going to be a bottleneck. Hard drives don't cause "latency" unless the drive is so slow that the computer is not keeping up, which makes for unstable recording anyway.
Your solution is an external FW400 or FW800 drive. (and NOT a USB 2.0 drive).
December 28, 2009 @01:25am
brianbfw

Another snag.
I haven't got my audio interface yet, but it was going to be either a Presonus FireStudio or the Apogee Enemble, both are FireWire. I only have 1 firewire port. So now's it's a touch call. Internal hard drive (which i know is bad) or change to a USB 2.0 device.
As Charlie Brown would say, Uggg!!!
December 29, 2009 @12:25am
jpleong

The Glyph Portagig has two FW800 ports: http://www.glyphtech.com/products/portagig/specifications.php
That way you can chain Interface -> Drive -> Macbook Pro.
The less portable Glyph drives also have multiple FW ports allowing you to aggregate devices.
JP
December 29, 2009 @12:39am
Paintballer26

im pretty sure u can
December 29, 2009 @02:28am
brianbfw

So your saying i could run daisy chain both the Glyph external hard drive and the FireWire interface off of the 1 FireWire 800 port on the max?
wouldn't that cause problems?
i though each device, audio interface and external hard drive would each need their own FireWire port.
December 29, 2009 @03:35am
yeahforbes

For what it's worth, I always use USB2.0 (simply because I constantly find myself hooking up to machines that lack FW, plus they're cheaper) and I have NEVER had it bring down my session. But I also don't normally use rates above 24-bit/48 kHz, and I don't typically have more than 35 tracks. I know there will be haters, and I actually do know all the science behind what they say. But I'm just saying.
December 29, 2009 @03:52am
jpleong

So your saying i could run daisy chain both the Glyph external hard drive and the FireWire interface off of the 1 FireWire 800 port on the max?

In theory, yes. Always test before the gig.
wouldn't that cause problems?

In theory, no. Always test before the gig.
i though each device, audio interface and external hard drive would each need their own FireWire port.

That's for bullet-proof, multi-redundant, best-case-scenario thinking. That kind of thinking would mean you're bringing a shock-rackmounted tower to the gig, too, which you're not... Depending on your Macbook Pro, you can possibly add additional FW ports (a whole new buss) via an Expresscard addition (check to see if your computer has such a port).
Although I can't speak from Apple experience in this case, some devices are hands-over better at daisy-chaining. Perhaps the most reliable FW interfaces are those made by RME. Research, research, research about your Apogee interface to see if anyone else is having success using it in a similar manner.
Not all FW drives are created equal, either. Use only drives powered by the Oxford-family of FW chipset controllers (922, 924, 936, etc...). Glyph and OWC are the two manufacturers of hard drive (enclosures) I use and they both use Oxford chipsets at the heart of their units.
JP
December 29, 2009 @01:22pm
michaelhoddy

So your saying i could run daisy chain both the Glyph external hard drive and the FireWire interface off of the 1 FireWire 800 port on the max?
wouldn't that cause problems?
i though each device, audio interface and external hard drive would each need their own FireWire port.

No, daisy-chaining is generally fine. Even with both devices inline, you're not likely to max out the capacity of the FireWire buss. I've never had any problems with this. But, as has already been mentioned, test first.
For what it's worth, most of the time there IS only one FireWire buss inside the average laptop or tower, so home-running each line is not materially any different in terms of bandwidth than daisy-chaining.
USB 2.0 has a high burst data transfer rate, but is much less consistent steady-state. If you are recording 24 tracks (like you say), this is almost certain to cause you problems. This is why there are very few large audio interfaces (over about 8 inputs) that use it.
December 29, 2009 @02:35pm
michaelhoddy

So your saying i could run daisy chain both the Glyph external hard drive and the FireWire interface off of the 1 FireWire 800 port on the max?
wouldn't that cause problems?
i though each device, audio interface and external hard drive would each need their own FireWire port.

No, daisy-chaining is generally fine. Even with both devices inline, you're not likely to max out the capacity of the FireWire buss. I've never had any problems with this. But, as has already been mentioned, test first.
For what it's worth, most of the time there IS only one FireWire buss inside the average laptop or tower, so home-running each line is not materially any different in terms of bandwidth than daisy-chaining.
USB 2.0 has a high burst data transfer rate, but is much less consistent steady-state. If you are recording 24 tracks (like you say), this is almost certain to cause you problems. This is why there are very few large audio interfaces (over about 8 inputs) that use it.
December 29, 2009 @02:37pm
michaelhoddy

So your saying i could run daisy chain both the Glyph external hard drive and the FireWire interface off of the 1 FireWire 800 port on the max?
wouldn't that cause problems?
i though each device, audio interface and external hard drive would each need their own FireWire port.

No, daisy-chaining is generally fine. Even with both devices inline, you're not likely to max out the capacity of the FireWire buss. I've never had any problems with this. But, as has already been mentioned, test first.
For what it's worth, most of the time there IS only one FireWire buss inside the average laptop or tower even if there are multiple ports, so home-running each line is not materially any different in terms of bandwidth than daisy-chaining.
USB 2.0 has a high burst data transfer rate, but is much less consistent steady-state. If you are recording 24 tracks (like you say), this is almost certain to cause you problems. This is why there are very few large audio interfaces (over about 8 inputs) that use it.
December 29, 2009 @02:37pm