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Question about vocoders/pitch shifting *PLEASE* help.

veridiantea

So I'm looking for a program/utility/technique to manually bending pitches to scale notes. As in, I want to be able to see exactly what note value I'm scaling a certain instrument's pitch to.
If anyone knows of the song Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger by Daft Punk or Overdose by Tomcraft, I want to find an efficient way of being able to modify my voice tracks to play pitches that were not there when recorded. ...I feel like I'm making no sense.....it's really hard for me to explain this for some reason haha.
So say I talk into the microphone...just normal voice at normal pitch. I want to then go in and change ANY given word/pitch to a scale note to create a melody out of what was originally just spoken text.
I have Logic and Metasynth Pro 4 on my Macbook Pro. If anyone has any recommendations for programs/plugins/anything I would be so appreciative.
Also if there is any way of changing a pitch on a certain track without having to modify the ENTIRE track, that may be of help....is there any way to do this?
Thanks!!
July 13, 2007 @12:08pm
itsfilthy

I've seen someone change up the pitch with the Waves pitch shifter...I forget what it's called, but I think he had the Diamond bundle, so whichever pitchshifter is in that bundle. He was changing it up so that the vocals were harmonizing and everything. It was pretty sick. Good luck....hope you're able to figure it out. OneLuv!
July 14, 2007 @12:15am
5454stevef

So I'm looking for a program/utility/technique to manually bending pitches to scale notes. As in, I want to be able to see exactly what note value I'm scaling a certain instrument's pitch to.
If anyone knows of the song Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger by Daft Punk or Overdose by Tomcraft, I want to find an efficient way of being able to modify my voice tracks to play pitches that were not there when recorded. ...I feel like I'm making no sense.....it's really hard for me to explain this for some reason haha.
So say I talk into the microphone...just normal voice at normal pitch. I want to then go in and change ANY given word/pitch to a scale note to create a melody out of what was originally just spoken text.
I have Logic and Metasynth Pro 4 on my Macbook Pro. If anyone has any recommendations for programs/plugins/anything I would be so appreciative.
Also if there is any way of changing a pitch on a certain track without having to modify the ENTIRE track, that may be of help....is there any way to do this?
Thanks!!

If I understand what you're asking....
Melodyne by Celemony comes to mind. A great product....
It's basically a pitch and timing correction tool, but it does a lot more than that.
I use the Cre8 version, which allows loading up to eight audio files at once, great for creating vocal arrangements and quick harmony parts. There's a "studio" version that allows loading a lot more tracks, and a solo version that does one track at a time.
All of them work as stand-alone or plug-in, although I've found the plug-in
mode in ProTools to be difficult to use to the point of not being usable at all. I always do my editing in stand-alone mode, in which case it's very reliable.
I'm not sure how it would do with spoken material, I've never tried that. It might not work very well because there's not much tonal information to work with, and you can't add it if it's not there, you can just modify what's there.
You might be able to approximate what you describe by some combination of formant and pitch modification, though.
For your purpose, say you have one or more notes in a vocal part you want to change. You would load the WAV file into Melodyne, where it would appear as a series of "blobs" at different locations relative to one another showing their pitches and timing. Pitches are shown on the left hand side "vertical" scale, as in a MIDI editor. It's really very similar to editing a MIDI file.
You use the "pitch move" tool, grab the blob that represents the note you want to edit, and move it to the desired pitch. It's that easy... in general, the further you move the note the more artificial it sounds, but if you only move it a short interval it usually sounds natural unless there's a lot of stuff on either side of the note that makes it sound impossible to sing, like some crazy slide.
You can also do formant editing to change the fixed resonant part of the tone either up or down, in effect changing a soprano to an alto, tenor sax to bari, etc. This helps to match the vocal tonality with the pitch being sung, but as I said big shifts introduce an artificial tonality that's very noticeable when heard by itself. This tends to be masked to a degree when you put the tracks in context, even with a capella music where you have created some harmonies from the original melody track.
It works properly only on tracks that have "monophonic" tonal information, such as solo voice, wind instruments, etc., the version I have doesn't deal with chords. You can automatically pitch correct every note in the file to a specified percentage of ideal, move individual notes, remove or enhance vibrato, adjust pitch drift, change formant pitch, adjust timing and length of notes, make a guess as to tempo, quantize notes to a given note value, stretch the file to fit a certain tempo, constrain melodies to a given key signature, the list goes on and on. For normal pitch correction and reasonable melody editing, I've found the results to be pretty much artifact-free.
In addition to all that, it also has a rhythmic mode for editing things like drum tracks - the hits appear as blobs in a straight line. You can either adjust them manually by sliding the blobs back and forth, or quantize them to a tempo that you either provide or have Melodyne detect. One thing that's cool is you can quantize to things like triplet feel, which completely changes the feel of the track. The tempo detection is spotty, I usually know what the tempo is ahead of time and set it manually, then move the file to line up with the grid. I've even gotten good results fixing a badly played rhythm guitar track with it.
Oh, yeah, it has an audio-to-MIDI function too, which would be pretty cool if it worked a little more predictably. so far I've not used it much, but it appears to be a sort of afterthought to me and doesn't work as well as I'd like. It could be that I've simply not given it the effort required to get it figured out. I'm no MIDI whiz for sure.
And, once it has a melody figured out it can display notation for it. Very handy for transcribing things.
Anyway, I think you can download a free trial version that works for a short time from their web site, which will give you a good idea whether it works for your application. That's what I did, and bought it almost immediately.
SF
July 23, 2007 @04:01am