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Proper cable from bass amp to speaker

Sound-Weavers.com

Hi gang, Which cable make and model is best to use with a bass amp and speaker cabinet? I have been using ordinary instrument cables to connect bass amp to speaker. But I'm curious if the proper cable will make a difference in sound.
Ampeg SVT6PRO to EDEN 4x10
The Ampeg manual recommends using the Speakon connectors.
What cable type should I use?
Salamat po.
June 25, 2007 @12:30am
BassBubble

Gerry
Dude DO NOT I reapeat DO NOT use instrument cables to hook your speakers up to your amps. You could seriously damage your amp and/or speakers.
Run don't walk to your local music store and buy a speaker cable. Any brand will do. Some brands are better than others,but, any brand of speaker cable is better than using a instrument cable.
I learned the hard way when I was a teen. Yes, I wrecked an amp using speaker cable. My parents are still pissed about it. LOL
Peace
Ed
June 26, 2007 @01:25am
Sound-Weavers.com

thanks man.
(running to the nearest audio store)....
June 26, 2007 @07:48am
jumpstreet7

The reason you need speaker cables instead of instrument is that speaker cables are "twin lead or un-shielded" cable this lets them have the right impedance for you speakers.:) instrument cables are shielded to pass low D.C. voltage signal. Using a large gauge twin lead wire is the best.12 to 10 gauge will be good.
July 17, 2007 @01:05am
goodnightgoddess

I push my amps fairly hard on the clean channel and use a 'thinner' gauge speaker cable. After about 30-45min the amps (both a solid state and tube) cut out. The constant here is the cabinet and speaker cable (I'm assuming my pedals are all fine - if anything they boost the signal).
Is it possible that a 'thicker' speaker cable will resolve this issue? I recall using larger speaker cables years ago and thinking this new one I had was a little thing (same outer thickness as an instrument cable).
I need to read the gauge of the cable itself but pray this will fix the issue and that I haven't damaged the heads!
Wish me luck / Share your knowledge!!!
November 14, 2007 @08:12pm
dpd

instrument cables are shielded to pass low D.C. voltage signal.

You can't be serious....
Unbalanced (e.g. coaxial) instrument cables are shielded to keep external fields from degrading the signal on the inner conductor.
Speaker cables are designed for higher current applications, therefore, the larger gauge and low impedance to minimize loss in the cable. BTW, speakers and cablesare not impedance-matched to amplifiers.
November 15, 2007 @12:55am
Lord Valve

The reason you need speaker cables instead of instrument is that speaker cables are "twin lead or un-shielded" cable this lets them have the right impedance for you speakers.:) instrument cables are shielded to pass low D.C. voltage signal. Using a large gauge twin lead wire is the best.12 to 10 gauge will be good.

Ahem...
This is wrong in so many ways, I'm not quite sure
where to start. First, the fact that a cable is
shielded doesn't have anything to do with whether
it can be used as a speaker cable or not. The main
reason not to use a shielded cable for connecting a
speaker is that the center conductor ("hot lead") in
most shielded cables is very small - 22 or even 24
gauge. If you attempt to put hundreds of watts
through a conductor that small, it will heat up
considerably, maybe enough to melt the insulation
and produce a short. Most amplifiers don't like
running into a short, and the magic smoke tends
to come out of the amp's expensive little parts. ;-)
If you could find a shielded cable with a heavy
enough center lead, you could use it with no
problem; most "guitar" cables will not have enough
copper in them to function well in such an application.
Such heavy-gauge shielded cables *do* exist - they're
just not commonly found in music stores.
"Twin lead" or "unshielded" cables don't have any effect
on the impedance of the speakers; cable impedance
is negligible when compared to speaker impedance,
which may be as low as 4 (or even 2) ohms nominal.
*Resistance* can certainly be a factor in a speaker
cable; it comes into play when you have a long
cable run to a low-impedance load. While bass amps
may indeed wind up driving low impedance loads, the
cable run is usually *very* short - a couple of feet
from the head to the cabinet. There is much
obfuscation/bovine excrement online about "magic"
cables which do wonderful things for your sound,
but the truth is that a decent piece of ordinary
12-gauge zipcord will produce identical results
to cables costing hundreds of dollars *in this
application*. If you're driving a 4-ohm load
and the cable is (say) three feet long, unless
you're running a thousand watts or better you
don't need anything larger. A 400-watt bass
head driving a 4-ohm box will put ten amps
through the cable; if it was forty feet long, you
might lose a portion of your power as heat in
the cable, but at three feet long that effect is
negligible.
Lastly, there's no such thing as a "low DC voltage
signal." All audio signals are (by definition) AC.
Lord Valve
Expert
November 18, 2007 @12:18am